I recently mused about how my next computer should be a Thinkpad running Debian. I still half-think that, but I feel conflict on the issue. Let me explain.

My first Mac was an iBook G3 running OS X 10.1 in 2002 and I’ve been on Apple computers exclusively since. I came from running desktop Linux (Gentoo at the time) and a major reason why I switched to OS X was the unix environment without the fiddling.

Over the years I starting developing native apps and valuing apps that take the time and effort to be consistent with the systems. The consistently between apps made the entire system feel cohesive and easy to use. “Mac Apps Behave / Are Designed Like This”. I was hooked. I am hooked.

But the world has changed since those days. We’re now connected to the net with fiber rather than dialing in for a ~couple~ all hours of the night. Web browsers have become the new platform to target and Every app is cross platform and nothing is native.

Hardware is a growing concern for me as well. Apple makes some of the best laptops. I look forward to the Apple Silicon Macs. But repairing your Mac often means replacing the entire unit and paying more than purchasing a new one. They’re no longer upgradable and filled with glue.

Contrasting with Thinkpads you can upgrade the ram, swap out the hard drive, add in LTE modems, and even change the display. If something breaks you can replace just that part. Expandability should allow the machine to have a longer life. I can even get them fully supported with Ubuntu or Fedora Linux.

If the software I use on a regular basis no longer native, not designed for the Mac, and everything is inconsistent, what’s the advantage of using them on the Mac?

  1. @pyrmont Right. The main things I worry (if I were to switch) would be those nice touches. Font rendering, gestures for workspaces, and things like the tripple-fingler tap to look up a word in the dictionary what probably my biggest worries of switch. And maybe my photos, not sure if I can access my entire library from the web.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *